Spaghetti from Graceland

‘Spaghetti from Graceland’ is by WA’s very own and most popular playwright, Noel O’Neil. With 30 plays now in his portfolio, this is a madcap sequel to the 2021 comedy, ‘Confetti from Graceland’. Often sequels are thin, weak versions of the original, with the playwright trying to squeeze out a few more laughs from the same jokes whilst living on the last show’s reputation. Here we have been given a completely new storyline. It is a loud, brash comedy with the same cast characters that we loved from the first production, but much more ‘over-the-top’. This show contains adult themes, sexual references and some coarse language, yes, you have been warned!

This 2-hour Harbour Theatre presentation is in conjunction with Maverick Theatre Productions (now in its eighth year). It can be seen at the Camelot Indoor Theatre (Mosman Park Memorial Hall), 16 Lochee Street in Mosman Park.

The season runs on Wednesday, Friday and Saturday evenings at 7.30, from Friday 4th March until Saturday 19th March. There are Sunday matinées at 2.00 pm on 6th, 13th and 20th

RESTAURANT DEALS NEARBY offering 10 – 15% discount. Show theatre tickets as proof attending that same day. Need to book table in advance and quote Harbour Theatre Camelot Meal Deal – Leave latest by 7.00 pm for theatre.

Himalayan Nepalese Restaurant, 634 Stirling Hwy, Mosman Park Ph: 6161-2290 Opens at 5.00 pm

Samson’s Paddock, 3 Glyde St, Mosman Park, Ph: 9385-3854 Opens 12.00 pm.

ONLY DOUBLE VACCINATED PEOPLE ARE ALLOWED TO ATTEND THEATRES.

PLEASE BE AWARE THAT YOU WILL BE REQUIRED TO SHOW PROOF OF DOUBLE VACCINATION

IF YOU CANNOT SHOW THE REQUIRED PROOF, THEN PLEASE DO NOT PROCEED WITH A BOOKING

Bookings at TAZ Tix   9255-3336  www.TAZtix.com.au

Sadly, at the time of writing only 50% of the seats are allowed to be sold, so please get in early.

The scene:           August 1979. An Italian house in the Brooklyn area of New York

The Set:                 The first floor living room has pale cream walls. A door on the audience left leads to the staircase down to their front door. A central archway in the rear wall leads to the bedrooms and kitchen. A massive mahogany table with two pedestal legs is central stage, there are matching chairs.

The décor is (deliberately naff) with numerous pictures distastefully arranged on the walls. A wainscot picture rail holds the many treasures relating to Elvis.

Quality construction and painting Brian Mahoney, Phil Redding, Rob Tagliaferri, Tina Barker, Grace Hitchin, Julie Mackay and Jarrod Buttery.

Lighting Design Rob Tagliaferri.

Sound Design Vanessa Gudgeon

Lighting and Sound Operator Callum Hunter was well-tuned in.

Front of House Manager Phil Redding backed by members of Harbour Theatre

It is the second anniversary of Elvis’s death, and his biggest fan Vince Nutz (Noel O’Neill) is trying to mourn, but his inappropriate family cannot let him enjoy his suffering. His riotous but aging in laws, senile Pop Campanelli (Rex Gray) and his loving caring wife, Ma Campanelli (Sharon Menzies), however, they live up to their Italian surname Campanelli – it means ‘alarm bells’! Their belligerent daughter, Rose Nutz (Narelle Belle) could be a clone of The Nanny’s Fran Drescher, and she gets most of her pleasure from fighting with Vince. Their daughter, Linda (Indiana Powell) is a beautiful girl, but she enjoys the pleasures of the bathroom and preparing for her husband Phillip (Alec Fuderer) to come home.

Amongst the pandemonium the doorbell rings. It is Vince’s accountant Tony (Kim Taylor) and his gullible, nervous secretary Angel (Meagan Harper), who is Linda’s best friend,

Will Elvis get the respect he deserves?

In the last production Noel wrote, directed and starred in the show – as well as having a busy daily life. Noel is highly talented, but by allowing comedy actor Sue Hasey to direct this sequel, she has brought to life a lot more visual jokes, and brought the subtle comedy to the fore, not allowing it to disappear into the furore.

This is a very experienced cast; each actor has a full understanding of the assortment of quirky characters they are playing. The very different personalities are very well developed and delivered with aplomb. The original show was ‘funny’ but this has a great deal more one-liners, double-entendres and is hilarious throughout. I can recommend accountant Tony’s exercises; I am a new man.

Very funny in both dialogue and visually. Great fun.